Tendon Infections

  • tendons are cords that connect muscles in the forearm and hand to the finger bones and which allow the muscles to move the fingers
  • tendons on the back of the hand and forearm straighten or extend the fingers.
    • these tendons run just under the skin and are visible through the skin on the back of the hand
  • tendons on the palm side of the hand and forearm bend or flex the fingers.
    • these tendons are deeper in the hand and fingers, and are held up against the bones by pulleys
  • tendons run in tubes, called tendon sheaths, which produce a lubricant that allows the tendons to slide back and forth
  • tendons, or their sheaths,  can become infected by lacerations or by puncture wounds. often caused by people trying to drain an abscess by poking it with a needle, which spreads the infection into the deeper tissues of the hand where the tendon sheaths lie.
  • tendon infections are characterized by pain and swelling along the tendon, and pain when moving the finger.
  • tendon infections usually require surgical drainage in the operating room, and IV antibiotics

Paronychia

  • an infection around the fingernail
  • if treated early, antibiotics should be sufficient
  • if neglected, can develop into an abscess that may require surgery

Cellulitis

  • an infection in the skin, characterized by pain, swelling, redness, and heat
  • can often be treated with oral antibiotics, but may need IV antibiotics for more resistant infections

David Y Globerman MD PLLC 

Plastic and Reconstructive

Hand Surgery

Call Us:  (954) 987 - 0222

Joint Infections

  • Joints are where the bones connect to each other
  • joints contain a lubricating fluid and are sealed from surrounding tissues
  • infections can occur via lacerations or puncture wounds
  • joint infections must be properly cleaned out to prevent permanent damage to the joint surfaces; small joints with minor infections may be cleaned out in the emergency room, whereas larger joints or more severe infections must be taken to the operating room for proper cleansing.

Felon

  • an abscess that develops under the pad of the fingertip
  • usually requires surgery to properly drain the abscess
  • if neglected, can spread to the joint or tendon sheath which then usually requires hospitalization and surgery.

Abscess

  • a localized collection of pus under the skin
  • if squeezed, the abscess can rupture into deeper tissues, spreading the infection
  • if poked with a needle, the infection can be spread into deeper tissues by the needle tip
  • proper treatment usually involves minor surgery to open and drain the abscess, with dressings and antibiotics to prevent the abscess from recurring